Rosetta

Carbon fibre stretches from comet to machine tools

Ultra-light carbon-fibre rods used to stiffen a comet probe’s legs are now being harnessed by a German manufacturer to boost the precision and efficiency of their laser cutters.
The Rosetta orbiter swoops over the lander soon after touchdown on Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

The Rosetta orbiter swoops over the lander soon after touchdown on Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

Article Content

Carbon-fibre rods guarantee safe landing

Right now, the rods in question are on a collision course with a comet – literally.

In 2014 ESA’s Rosetta spacecraft will end a decade-long chase through space by catching up with Comet Churyumov–Gerasimenko.

It will orbit the comet and release its Philae lander to anchor itself to the icy surface.

To ensure a safe landing, the lander’s legs are made of lightweight carbon fibre rods.

Designed by Schütze, a German company in Braunschweig, these rods are six times lighter than steel, but can be made up to 50% stiffer.

These 'sandwich rods' have a lightweight, rigid foam core wrapped in carbon fibre and coated with thin fibreglass.

“No mould is necessary, making the production of tailored rod dimensions feasible,” said director Rainer Schütze. As well as the lander legs, the folding antenna and frame of Rosetta are also based on the lightweight rods.

“The carbon fibre sandwich rods combine high strength and stiffness with very low weight,” added Mr Schütze.

Thanks to ESA’s Technology Transfer Programme, the rods’ special qualities are also improving products here on Earth.
Pictures of the article
Rosetta - Carbon fibre stretches from comet to machine tools | Redshift live

Rosetta

Carbon fibre stretches from comet to machine tools

Ultra-light carbon-fibre rods used to stiffen a comet probe’s legs are now being harnessed by a German manufacturer to boost the precision and efficiency of their laser cutters.
The Rosetta orbiter swoops over the lander soon after touchdown on Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

The Rosetta orbiter swoops over the lander soon after touchdown on Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

Article Content

Carbon-fibre rods guarantee safe landing

Right now, the rods in question are on a collision course with a comet – literally.

In 2014 ESA’s Rosetta spacecraft will end a decade-long chase through space by catching up with Comet Churyumov–Gerasimenko.

It will orbit the comet and release its Philae lander to anchor itself to the icy surface.

To ensure a safe landing, the lander’s legs are made of lightweight carbon fibre rods.

Designed by Schütze, a German company in Braunschweig, these rods are six times lighter than steel, but can be made up to 50% stiffer.

These 'sandwich rods' have a lightweight, rigid foam core wrapped in carbon fibre and coated with thin fibreglass.

“No mould is necessary, making the production of tailored rod dimensions feasible,” said director Rainer Schütze. As well as the lander legs, the folding antenna and frame of Rosetta are also based on the lightweight rods.

“The carbon fibre sandwich rods combine high strength and stiffness with very low weight,” added Mr Schütze.

Thanks to ESA’s Technology Transfer Programme, the rods’ special qualities are also improving products here on Earth.
Pictures of the article
» print article
Search
Astronomy Software

Solar Eclipse by Redshift

Solar Eclipse by Redshift for iOS

Observe, understand, and marvel at the solar eclipse on August 21, 2017! » more

Solar Eclipse by Redshift

Solar Eclipse by Redshift for Android

Observe, understand, and marvel at the solar eclipse on August 21, 2017! » more

Redshift Android

Redshift for Android

The award winning Astronomy Software Redshift for Android. » more

Redshift Pro

Redshift Pro - Astronomy for iOS

The most advanced Redshift app » more

Redshift Astronomy

Redshift - Astronomy for iOS

The award winning Astronomy Software Redshift for iPhone, iPod touch and iPad. » more

Redshift Discover Astronomy deutsch

Redshift Compact - Discover Astronomy for iOS

The beginners version of the leading astronomy App Redshift » more

Redshift 8 Premium

Redshift 8 Premium - Download Edition (Multilingua Edition)

Explore the universe from your PC with the award-winning and professional planetarium software - Languages: German, English, French
 » more

Redshift 8 Premium DL deutsch/engl 2

Redshift 8 Premium - Update from older versions

Update from Redshift 7 or older to the current version of the professional planetarium software - Languages: German, English, French
 » more

Redshift 8 Compact

Redshift 8 Compact - Download Edition

The professional planetarium software for beginners » more

Rosetta

Carbon fibre stretches from comet to machine tools

Ultra-light carbon-fibre rods used to stiffen a comet probe’s legs are now being harnessed by a German manufacturer to boost the precision and efficiency of their laser cutters.
The Rosetta orbiter swoops over the lander soon after touchdown on Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

The Rosetta orbiter swoops over the lander soon after touchdown on Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

Article Content

Carbon-fibre rods guarantee safe landing

Right now, the rods in question are on a collision course with a comet – literally.

In 2014 ESA’s Rosetta spacecraft will end a decade-long chase through space by catching up with Comet Churyumov–Gerasimenko.

It will orbit the comet and release its Philae lander to anchor itself to the icy surface.

To ensure a safe landing, the lander’s legs are made of lightweight carbon fibre rods.

Designed by Schütze, a German company in Braunschweig, these rods are six times lighter than steel, but can be made up to 50% stiffer.

These 'sandwich rods' have a lightweight, rigid foam core wrapped in carbon fibre and coated with thin fibreglass.

“No mould is necessary, making the production of tailored rod dimensions feasible,” said director Rainer Schütze. As well as the lander legs, the folding antenna and frame of Rosetta are also based on the lightweight rods.

“The carbon fibre sandwich rods combine high strength and stiffness with very low weight,” added Mr Schütze.

Thanks to ESA’s Technology Transfer Programme, the rods’ special qualities are also improving products here on Earth.
Pictures of the article
» print article

Search
Astronomy Software

Solar Eclipse by Redshift

Solar Eclipse by Redshift for iOS

Observe, understand, and marvel at the solar eclipse on August 21, 2017! » more

Solar Eclipse by Redshift

Solar Eclipse by Redshift for Android

Observe, understand, and marvel at the solar eclipse on August 21, 2017! » more

Redshift Android

Redshift for Android

The award winning Astronomy Software Redshift for Android. » more

Redshift Pro

Redshift Pro - Astronomy for iOS

The most advanced Redshift app » more

Redshift Astronomy

Redshift - Astronomy for iOS

The award winning Astronomy Software Redshift for iPhone, iPod touch and iPad. » more

Redshift Discover Astronomy deutsch

Redshift Compact - Discover Astronomy for iOS

The beginners version of the leading astronomy App Redshift » more

Redshift 8 Premium

Redshift 8 Premium - Download Edition (Multilingua Edition)

Explore the universe from your PC with the award-winning and professional planetarium software - Languages: German, English, French
 » more

Redshift 8 Premium DL deutsch/engl 2

Redshift 8 Premium - Update from older versions

Update from Redshift 7 or older to the current version of the professional planetarium software - Languages: German, English, French
 » more

Redshift 8 Compact

Redshift 8 Compact - Download Edition

The professional planetarium software for beginners » more