NASA Calendar

NASA Science Mission Directorate January 2009

NASA's Hot Topic: Telescopes and Space Probes: Today’s Starry Messengers

Go Observe with NASA - Venus

NASA & Galileo Facts
Using the unique orbit of NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and a depth-perceiving trick called parallax, astronomers have determined the distance to an invisible Milky Way object called OGLE-2005-SMC-001. This artist's concept illustrates how this trick wor

Using the unique orbit of NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and a depth-perceiving trick called parallax, astronomers have determined the distance to an invisible Milky Way object called OGLE-2005-SMC-001. This artist's concept illustrates how this trick wor

January 2009
NASA Hot Topic Telescopes and Space Probes: Today’s Starry Messengers: We celebrate the ongoing
contributions of NASA’s telescopes and space probes to the scientific legacy that Galileo
initiated 400 years ago with his celestial observations and the publication of Siderius Nuncius –
“The Starry Messenger”.

Go Observe with NASA Venus: By observing the phases of Venus, Galileo concluded Venus orbits the Sun - and not
the Earth. The planet Venus is the brightest celestial object in the sky after the Sun and the
Moon, and appears brighter to us than the star Sirius. January is the best time to view Venus in
the evening sky in 2009.

NASA Mission Milestones
• American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting press releases from NASA missions, Long Beach, CA, January 4-8, 2009.

International IYA Events
• Opening ceremony at UNESCO HQ, Paris, France, January 15-16, 2009
US IYA Events • Joint US-NASA IYA opening ceremony at AAS and special sessions, January 6-7, 2009
• Local IYA opening events, January 10, 2009

NASA IYA Events • Joint US-NASA IYA opening ceremony at AAS and special sessions, January 6-7, 2009
• Visions of the Universe: Four Centuries of Discovery, a traveling exhibit for libraries begins
national tour January 21, 2009.

NASA Facts • 5th anniversary of Mars Exploration Rover landings (January 4 and January 25)

Galileo Facts • Galileo first observed three “stars” near Jupiter on January 7, 1610. By January 15, 1610,
he concluded that four objects were orbiting Jupiter.

NASA
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